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Tips of the Week for February, 2014

Toothbrushing Tips for Young Children
02-24-2014

​Each child has different skills and needs that can guide parents in helping him or her brush.

Tips to Help Young Children Practice Brushing & Make It A Good Experience:

  • Choosing a toothbrush. Use a soft-bristled toothbrush designed for brushing an infant’s or child’s teeth.
  • Holding a toothbrush. If the child has trouble holding a toothbrush, try making the handle thicker by putting it inside a tennis ball. The toothbrush handle can also be strapped to the child’s hand with a wide rubber band, a hair band, or Velcro. Toothbrushes with thick handles can also be found in retail and discount stores.
  • Teaching the child how to brush. Break the process into small steps that the child can understand and practice. Ask a dentist, dental hygienist, occupational therapist, or early childhood specialist for help, if needed. Another way is to place a hand over the child’s hand to guide the toothbrush as the child brushes. 
  • Using toothpaste with fluoride. Use toothpaste with fluoride that the child likes and that feels good in his or her mouth. An adult should always place toothpaste on the toothbrush. 
    • For children under age 2: Use a small smear of toothpaste. 
    • For children ages 2–5: Use a pea-size amount of toothpaste. 
    • If a child cannot spit: Have the child tilt his or her mouth down so that the toothpaste can dribble out into the sink, a cup, or a washcloth. 
  • Positioning the child. There are many ways a child can be positioned to make the child feel comfortable and allow an adult to brush his or her teeth. 
  • Keeping the child engaged in brushing. Use a timer, a short song, or counting as a game to encourage brushing for 2 minutes.

Additional Information:

Provided by HealhyChildren.org – For additional information please go to  http://www.healthychildren.org/English/healthy-living/oral-health/Pages/Toothbrushing-Tips-for-Young-Children.aspx

Last Updated

12/30/2013

Source

Brush Up on Oral Health Newsletter (Copyright © 2013 The National Center on Health)

The information contained on this Web site should not be used as a substitute for the medical care and advice of your pediatrician. There may be variations in treatment that your pediatrician may recommend based on individual facts and circumstances.

 


Tooth Brushing Tips for Young Children
02-10-2014

​Each child has different skills and needs that can guide parents in helping him or her brush.

Tips to Help Young Children Practice Brushing & Make It A Good Experience:

  • Choosing a toothbrush. Use a soft-bristled toothbrush designed for brushing an infant’s or child’s teeth.
  • Holding a toothbrush. If the child has trouble holding a toothbrush, try making the handle thicker by putting it inside a tennis ball. The toothbrush handle can also be strapped to the child’s hand with a wide rubber band, a hair band, or Velcro. Toothbrushes with thick handles can also be found in retail and discount stores.
  • Teaching the child how to brush. Break the process into small steps that the child can understand and practice. Ask a dentist, dental hygienist, occupational therapist, or early childhood specialist for help, if needed. Another way is to place a hand over the child’s hand to guide the toothbrush as the child brushes. 
  • Using toothpaste with fluoride. Use toothpaste with fluoride that the child likes and that feels good in his or her mouth. An adult should always place toothpaste on the toothbrush. 
    • For children under age 2: Use a small smear of toothpaste. 
    • For children ages 2–5: Use a pea-size amount of toothpaste. 
    • If a child cannot spit: Have the child tilt his or her mouth down so that the toothpaste can dribble out into the sink, a cup, or a washcloth. 
  • Positioning the child. There are many ways a child can be positioned to make the child feel comfortable and allow an adult to brush his or her teeth. 
  • Keeping the child engaged in brushing. Use a timer, a short song, or counting as a game to encourage brushing for 2 minutes.

All information provided by HealthyChildren.org – For additional information including helpful links, please go to http://www.healthychildren.org/English/healthy-living/oral-health/Pages/Toothbrushing-Tips-for-Young-Children.aspx

Additional Information Provided by HealthyChildren.org


Is There A Gun Where Your Child Plays? Asking Can Save Lives
02-03-2014

​ A gun, found by a child, can change lives forever in just a few moments. Parents are reminded to ask other parents if there is a gun in the home where their child is going to play.

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) helped to start ASK Day, which is led by the Center to Prevent Youth Violence, to prevent injuries and deaths from guns that are stored unsafely in homes.

About 1/3 of homes with kids have guns, many left unlocked or loaded. Just talking to your child about the dangers of firearms is not enough. Children are naturally curious. If a gun is accessible in someone’s home, there is a good chance a child will find it and play with it. Countless tragedies have occurred when kids found guns that parents thought were well hidden or safely stored.

The message of the ASK campaign to parents is this: if your child is going to play or hang out at a home where he hasn’t been before, ask if there is a gun in that home. If the answer is no, that’s one less thing to worry about. If the answer is yes, then you need to ask how the gun is stored—it should be stored in a locked location and unloaded. Ammunition should be locked up separately. If you are not comfortable with the answers, you should invite the other child to play at your house instead.

“Keeping children and teens safe from preventable injuries is one of the most important things we do as pediatricians,” said AAP President Thomas K. McInerny, MD, FAAP. “We ask parents about guns just as we ask about swimming pools, poisons, car seats, and other safety issues. Parents should feel comfortable asking each other about these things as well.”

Asking this simple question is an important step every parent can take to help their kids stay safe. The ASK Campaign offers tips for parents to make the conversation easier.

The AAP remains committed to reducing gun injuries to children, and advocates for stronger gun laws, comprehensive access to mental health care, and necessary funding for federal gun violence research and prevention efforts.

For information on ASK Day, please visit the ASK Day page here.

Additional Resources:

Information provided by Healthychildren.org.  For additional information and resources, please go to the following web address - http://www.healthychildren.org/English/news/Pages/Is-There-A-Gun-Where-Your-Child-Plays-Asking-Can-Save-Lives.aspx

Published 6/18/2013 12:00 AM by HealthyChildren.org

 


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